Blogging anything and everything to do with writing and books. Also creative stuff, places that draw inspiration, or as the title suggests anything that you might want to look back at for reference.

July 26th, 2014
tumblemagazine:

GETTING TO KNOW YOUR BEST FRIEND
Sometimes conversations with even your best friend can dull down to talking about what you did on the weekend, homework or even the weather so instead of carrying on a conversation in which neither of you are even paying attention, ask the other person interesting questions to boost your conversation and to get to know them better.
However, only do this with someone your really close with and completely trust because some of these can be quite personal but by doing this, there’s a good chance that your relationship with this person will grow and you’ll become ever closer.
Questions You Can Ask:
Would you rather be happy and poor or unhappy and rich?
What motto do you live life by?
Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
If you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would you be?
What do you want most in life right now?
If you could have 3 wishes (no more), what would they be?
What are the top 5 things you want to do before you die?
What’s the best thing about your life right now?
Which do you prefer, a wild passionate relationship or a quiet calm one?
What’s something that no one (or not many people) knows about you?
Have you ever been (or are you) in love?
Is there a certain song that you’re personally attached to or can relate to? And why?
Are you happy right now?
*The questions above are (kind of) in order of how personal they are.
 - by Mel xx

tumblemagazine:

GETTING TO KNOW YOUR BEST FRIEND

Sometimes conversations with even your best friend can dull down to talking about what you did on the weekend, homework or even the weather so instead of carrying on a conversation in which neither of you are even paying attention, ask the other person interesting questions to boost your conversation and to get to know them better.

However, only do this with someone your really close with and completely trust because some of these can be quite personal but by doing this, there’s a good chance that your relationship with this person will grow and you’ll become ever closer.

Questions You Can Ask:

  • Would you rather be happy and poor or unhappy and rich?
  • What motto do you live life by?
  • Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
  • If you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would you be?
  • What do you want most in life right now?
  • If you could have 3 wishes (no more), what would they be?
  • What are the top 5 things you want to do before you die?
  • What’s the best thing about your life right now?
  • Which do you prefer, a wild passionate relationship or a quiet calm one?
  • What’s something that no one (or not many people) knows about you?
  • Have you ever been (or are you) in love?
  • Is there a certain song that you’re personally attached to or can relate to? And why?
  • Are you happy right now?

*The questions above are (kind of) in order of how personal they are.

 - by Mel xx

July 25th, 2014
July 18th, 2014

Hi, I wanted to know if you happen to have any resources on writing and fleshing out a deep and significant friendship? I'm writing something with the plot featuring a very close friendship between two people, and I want to know how I can make the most with that. Thank you c:
Asketh - shoutingwalls

Hi, sorry for the late reply but I was away yesterday. 

You haven’t told me what type of friendship it is so it’s a little vague but two good resources are this ask that was answered by another great writing blog with more resources linked within the answer and this website that should also help a lot. 

If this doesn’t help then I’m sorry and I will try and find more resources and tips next time. 

July 16th, 2014

teawithmadeleines:

bittenandwritten:

vintageanchorbooks:

This list is still so great. 

Yup, these will scare your pants completely off. Invest in a nightlight.

The Turn of the Screw is amazing!!! 

(via thewritingcafe)

July 15th, 2014
lolcamhs:

feelings:
depressed 

what am i feeling?
if you feel like crap
dealing with depression
 let go of your past.
what is depression?/
depression & cutting
things to do instead of cutting
the cure to sadness! (in under 3 minutes)
things to do when you’re sad 
feel good 101: depression

suicidal

everything
hotlines
FAQ's about suicide
reasons to live
statistics about suicide
suicidal feelings
feeling suicidal?
know someone who’s suicidal?
warning signs
websites you can call

anxious

how to calm yourself down during an anxiety attack
helpful tips
create a mind palace
6 breathing exercises
3 more breathing exercises 

self help

everything
20 self help ideas
for when you’re sad
for when you’re anxious
for when you’re angry
looking for a sign not to kill yourself?
tumblr support

self harm

alternatives 1 2 
think twice before you self harm
vent your thoughts
virtual self harm (trigger warning)

LGBT

gay center
glaad
no h8 
the trevor project

cute ass links

feeling disgruntled?
emergency compliment
make everything okay
vent to strangers
free online therapy
cute animal videos
i don’t even know what to call this
funny posts
A WHOLE LOT OF MOVIES TO WATCH

help other people

win rice for people
click to give free necessities to
autism
breast cancer
hunger
animals

games

stickman
silkweave
250+
do some painting
super mario bros
virtual piano
other music thingy
colour game

the quiet place project

receive instant love
90 seconds relaxation exercise
vent to strangers
know that it will be okay
find some quiet
get rid of unwanted thoughts

lolcamhs:

feelings:

depressed 

what am i feeling?

if you feel like crap

dealing with depression

 let go of your past.

what is depression?/

depression & cutting

things to do instead of cutting

the cure to sadness! (in under 3 minutes)

things to do when you’re sad 

feel good 101: depression

suicidal

everything

hotlines

FAQ's about suicide

reasons to live

statistics about suicide

suicidal feelings

feeling suicidal?

know someone who’s suicidal?

warning signs

websites you can call

anxious

how to calm yourself down during an anxiety attack

helpful tips

create a mind palace

6 breathing exercises

3 more breathing exercises 

self help

everything

20 self help ideas

for when you’re sad

for when you’re anxious

for when you’re angry

looking for a sign not to kill yourself?

tumblr support

self harm

alternatives 1 2 

think twice before you self harm

vent your thoughts

virtual self harm (trigger warning)

LGBT

gay center

glaad

no h8 

the trevor project

cute ass links

feeling disgruntled?

emergency compliment

make everything okay

vent to strangers

free online therapy

cute animal videos

i don’t even know what to call this

funny posts

A WHOLE LOT OF MOVIES TO WATCH

help other people

win rice for people

click to give free necessities to

games

stickman

silkweave

250+

do some painting

super mario bros

virtual piano

other music thingy

colour game

the quiet place project

receive instant love

90 seconds relaxation exercise

vent to strangers

know that it will be okay

find some quiet

get rid of unwanted thoughts

(via castielsarmycommander)

glaukopis:

The Detective’s Officecigarette smoke, gun oil, and jazzlisten on 8tracks

Andrew Hale Main Theme L.A. Noire · Erdenstern Mountains of Madness At the Mountains of Madness · Alex North Belle Reeve A Streetcar Named Desire · Jerry Goldsmith The Wrong Clue Chinatown · Leith Stevens Lilli Private Hell 36 · Miles Davis Générique Ascenseur pour L’échafaud (Elevator to the Gallows) · Andrew Hale Minor 9th L.A. Noire · Alex North Blanche A Streetcar Named Desire · Seatbelts Farewell Blues (Alternate Take) Cowboy Bebop Boxed Set · Elmer Bernstein Toots Shor’s Blues Sweet Smell of Success · Chico Hamilton & Fred Katz Goodbye Baby Blues Sweet Smell of Success · Elmer Bernstein Thinking of Baby Johnny Staccato · Erdenstern The City That Never Sleeps Again At the Mountains of Madness · Duke Ellington Almost Cried [Studio] Anatomy of a Murder · Stan Tracey Starless and Bible Black Under Milk Wood · Seatbelts Cosmos Cowboy Bebop OST I

glaukopis:

The Detective’s Office
cigarette smoke, gun oil, and jazz
listen on 8tracks

Andrew Hale Main Theme L.A. Noire · Erdenstern Mountains of Madness At the Mountains of Madness · Alex North Belle Reeve A Streetcar Named Desire · Jerry Goldsmith The Wrong Clue Chinatown · Leith Stevens Lilli Private Hell 36 · Miles Davis Générique Ascenseur pour L’échafaud (Elevator to the Gallows) · Andrew Hale Minor 9th L.A. Noire · Alex North Blanche A Streetcar Named Desire · Seatbelts Farewell Blues (Alternate Take) Cowboy Bebop Boxed Set · Elmer Bernstein Toots Shor’s Blues Sweet Smell of Success · Chico Hamilton & Fred Katz Goodbye Baby Blues Sweet Smell of Success · Elmer Bernstein Thinking of Baby Johnny Staccato · Erdenstern The City That Never Sleeps Again At the Mountains of Madness · Duke Ellington Almost Cried [Studio] Anatomy of a Murder · Stan Tracey Starless and Bible Black Under Milk Wood · Seatbelts Cosmos Cowboy Bebop OST I

Songs For The Moment

I’m now doing this new section called and tagged “Songs For The Moment”. I’m hoping that by me reblogging mixes and songs and tagging them with moods or moments that I think fit, that you’ll find some good music to write to or inspire you. 

Please tell me if you think this will help you?

backtopanic:

La Luna | Listen 

i. Home - Gabrielle Alpin ii. Big Jet Plane (Acoustic) - Angus & Julia Stone iii. Can’t help falling in love with you - Fleet Foxes iv. Holocene - Bon Iver v. I will Follow You Into The Dark - Death Cab For Cutie vi. Smother - Daughter vii. Northern Winds - City and Colours viii. Promise - Ben Howard ix.Your Protector - Fleet Foxes x. Draw Your Swords - Angus & Julia Stone xi. Slow It Down - The Lumineers xii. Angels - The xx xiii. Medicine - Daughter xiv. Come Together - Young Heretics

backtopanic:

La Luna | Listen 

i. Home - Gabrielle Alpin ii. Big Jet Plane (Acoustic) - Angus & Julia Stone iii. Can’t help falling in love with you - Fleet Foxes iv. Holocene - Bon Iver v. I will Follow You Into The Dark - Death Cab For Cutie vi. Smother - Daughter vii. Northern Winds - City and Colours viii. Promise - Ben Howard ix.Your Protector - Fleet Foxes x. Draw Your Swords - Angus & Julia Stone xi. Slow It Down - The Lumineers xii. Angels - The xx xiii. Medicine - Daughter xiv. Come Together - Young Heretics

uneditededit:

Character Motivation and Consistency:  
So lets take a moment to talk about character consistency.  This is something that I find a lot of people have a hard time with and a lot of it has to do with the actual development of the character in itself.  When making a character, we pick out traits and experiences that define our character.  All of these things including flaws and talents are important but something that people tend to forget with picking out a character is what their motivation is.  

Author Orson Scott Card reminds us “We never fully understand other people’s motivations in real life.  In fiction, however, we can help our readers understand our characters’ motivations with clarity, sometimes even certainty. This is one of the reasons why people read fiction—to come to some understanding of why other people act the way they do.”

Why is Knowing Motivation Important in Writing?:
This essentially, explains to us why characters act the way they do.  Choices are determined by the motivation of the character.  They are a guide in the choices they make because where they want to go or what they want determines what choices they are going to make.  Very very VERY seldom does anyone make a choice at random. By knowing your characters primary motivation, the choices that they make will remain consistent (Even if they are not the ‘right’ choices.  
Basic External and Internal Motivations:  

EXTERNAL: Bold-face is obverse aspect (stuff in parens = goals, effects, or other association)
Survival/safety; Fear of the world (food, water, escape from danger)
Physical comfort; gluttony (shelter, warmth, good food, health)
Pleasure; hedonism (sex, great food, culture, games)
Dominance; tyranny (power, social standing, competition, respect)
Acquisitiveness; greed (wealth, materialism, collecting, excellence)
Curiosity; voyeurism (learning, searching, investigating)
Mastery; perfectionism (excellence, conquest, discipline, achievement)
Reproduction; profligacy (children, creativity, family-building)
INTERNAL:
Autonomy; isolation (self-sufficiency, freedom, non-confinement)
Affiliation; conformity (security, cooperation, loyalty, clan)
Love; lust/ownership (connection, passion, sex, mirroring, approval, giving)
Revenge; justice (righting wrongs, recognition of grievance, vengeance)
Guilt; denial of guilt (responsibility, shame, punishment, redemption, forgiveness)
Identity; self-centeredness (self-esteem, self-knowledge, self-protection)
Surcease; conflict avoidance (peace, escape from anxiety, death)
Spirituality; fetishism (religion, transcendence, transformation)
Growth; decay, aging (learning, maturation, wisdom)
Ambition; insecurity/anxiety (fear of failure, inferiority, stress)
Vindication; rationalization (success, proving self, apology)

The Difference in between a Goal and Motivation:

The goal is like the flower… the motivation is the roots.
The goal is the outward manifestation of the motivation. It is concrete, measurable, and specific. You don’t know when you’ve fulfilled the motivation: “I want success” isn’t measurable– what’s success?  But you know when you’ve achieved a goal:  ”I want to be on the New York Times bestseller list–” That’s measurable. You’ll know when you reach it.
Just keep in mind that while the goal is the external manifestation of the motivation, the connection is not always a straight or clear one.  You can have a goal that is destructive and against your true motivation– “looking for love in all the wrong places” is an example. Or you can have a laudatory goal for a selfish or twisted motivation– “I want to be first in my class to show my father up!”
Motivation is the past; Goal is the future; Conflict is the present.

Distinguish between MOTIVATION and ACTION:

Remember that motivation exists to inspire the character to make choices and take actions.  If you’ve been told your protagonist is “too passive”, it’s likely what’s lacking is motivation that leads to action. 
Every action, however small, should be motivated.  If the motivation is obvious, then you might not have to show it (we assume that she’s running from that tiger for survival). 
Compare the external (obvious) motivation to the goal and/or actions.  If they don’t match, an internal motivation is probably in force. What hidden desire or fear is influencing actions? An alternative reason for motivation/action mismatch: You’re trying to make an original character act in stereotypical ways.
And keep this in mind: Heroism and villainy are in the action, not the motivation.  Heroes do heroic things, they don’t just intend to do them.  And villains do bad things even if they have the best of intentions.

Taking all of these things into account, here are three exercises that I found a while back and use to help figure out character motivations:

1. Real People as a template: 
Make a list of 5 people you know really well. Beside each, make notes about how they:
react to stress
experience happiness,
treat other people.
After that, list what motivates each of these behaviors. Try to be as factual as possible, drawing from things you know; for things you’re unsure of, use common sense to hypothesize.
A person might make it their goal to treat others with respect because of religious beliefs, or maybe because they were disrespected in the past. Someone might react poorly to stressful situations because they have a deep-seated fear of failure, stemming from a past experience.
2. Characters from Literature:
List 5 characters from literature and what motivated their actions throughout their respective stories.
For example, Shakespeare’sHamlet. His thoughts are motivated by revenge (because his uncle secretly killed his father), along with anger, sadness and confusion (because his mother married his uncle so soon after his father’s death).
Add to this a host of other factors, and you have a well-developed character you can understand.
3. Self reflection: 
Write paragraphs to describe
 your most frightening experience
 your happiest experience,
your most stressful experience, and how you reacted to each situation.
After, list all the factors that motivated your behavior. How is your personality shaped by your motivations?

During the story (Or role play) it is important to remember these character motivations when your character makes choices.  That is really what this is about; identifying the motivations that make your character act the way that they do.  
During the plot, motivations may change, and should actually shift for the character to develop, but never all at once and never out of the blue.  Still the back story that drives your characters motivations will always be part of them.  
For instance; I write a character whose past has made her a survivalist but over the course of a year she shifts to protection of the family that she has developed.  However this took a full year to happen and her motivation of survival was never put on the back burner.  Instead it just expanded to protection of the group and not just herself.  Her fear of lose over this new family is what really drives her.
And there you have it: Keeping your character consistent through their motivation.

uneditededit:

Character Motivation and Consistency:  

So lets take a moment to talk about character consistency.  This is something that I find a lot of people have a hard time with and a lot of it has to do with the actual development of the character in itself.  When making a character, we pick out traits and experiences that define our character.  All of these things including flaws and talents are important but something that people tend to forget with picking out a character is what their motivation is.  

Author Orson Scott Card reminds us “We never fully understand other people’s motivations in real life.  In fiction, however, we can help our readers understand our characters’ motivations with clarity, sometimes even certainty. This is one of the reasons why people read fiction—to come to some understanding of why other people act the way they do.”

Why is Knowing Motivation Important in Writing?:

This essentially, explains to us why characters act the way they do.  Choices are determined by the motivation of the character.  They are a guide in the choices they make because where they want to go or what they want determines what choices they are going to make.  Very very VERY seldom does anyone make a choice at random. By knowing your characters primary motivation, the choices that they make will remain consistent (Even if they are not the ‘right’ choices.  

Basic External and Internal Motivations:  

EXTERNAL: 
Bold-face is obverse aspect (stuff in parens = goals, effects, or other association)

  • Survival/safety; Fear of the world (food, water, escape from danger)
  • Physical comfort; gluttony (shelter, warmth, good food, health)
  • Pleasure; hedonism (sex, great food, culture, games)
  • Dominance; tyranny (power, social standing, competition, respect)
  • Acquisitiveness; greed (wealth, materialism, collecting, excellence)
  • Curiosity; voyeurism (learning, searching, investigating)
  • Mastery; perfectionism (excellence, conquest, discipline, achievement)
  • Reproduction; profligacy (children, creativity, family-building)


INTERNAL:

  • Autonomy; isolation (self-sufficiency, freedom, non-confinement)
  • Affiliation; conformity (security, cooperation, loyalty, clan)
  • Love; lust/ownership (connection, passion, sex, mirroring, approval, giving)
  • Revenge; justice (righting wrongs, recognition of grievance, vengeance)
  • Guilt; denial of guilt (responsibility, shame, punishment, redemption, forgiveness)
  • Identity; self-centeredness (self-esteem, self-knowledge, self-protection)
  • Surcease; conflict avoidance (peace, escape from anxiety, death)
  • Spirituality; fetishism (religion, transcendence, transformation)
  • Growth; decay, aging (learning, maturation, wisdom)
  • Ambition; insecurity/anxiety (fear of failure, inferiority, stress)
  • Vindication; rationalization (success, proving self, apology)

The Difference in between a Goal and Motivation:

The goal is like the flower… the motivation is the roots.

The goal is the outward manifestation of the motivation. It is concrete, measurable, and specific. 
You don’t know when you’ve fulfilled the motivation: “I want success” isn’t measurable– what’s success?  But you know when you’ve achieved a goal:  ”I want to be on the New York Times bestseller list–” That’s measurable. You’ll know when you reach it.

Just keep in mind that while the goal is the external manifestation of the motivation, the connection is not always a straight or clear one.  You can have a goal that is destructive and against your true motivation– “looking for love in all the wrong places” is an example. 
Or you can have a laudatory goal for a selfish or twisted motivation– “I want to be first in my class to show my father up!”

Motivation is the past; Goal is the future; Conflict is the present.

Distinguish between MOTIVATION and ACTION:

Remember that motivation exists to inspire the character to make choices and take actions.  If you’ve been told your protagonist is “too passive”, it’s likely what’s lacking is motivation that leads to action. 

Every action, however small, should be motivated.  If the motivation is obvious, then you might not have to show it (we assume that she’s running from that tiger for survival). 

Compare the external (obvious) motivation to the goal and/or actions.  If they don’t match, an internal motivation is probably in force. What hidden desire or fear is influencing actions? 
An alternative reason for motivation/action mismatch: You’re trying to make an original character act in stereotypical ways.

And keep this in mind: 
Heroism and villainy are in the action, not the motivation.  Heroes do heroic things, they don’t just intend to do them.  And villains do bad things even if they have the best of intentions.

Taking all of these things into account, here are three exercises that I found a while back and use to help figure out character motivations:

1. Real People as a template: 

Make a list of 5 people you know really well. Beside each, make notes about how they:

  1. react to stress
  2. experience happiness,
  3. treat other people.

After that, list what motivates each of these behaviors. Try to be as factual as possible, drawing from things you know; for things you’re unsure of, use common sense to hypothesize.

A person might make it their goal to treat others with respect because of religious beliefs, or maybe because they were disrespected in the past. Someone might react poorly to stressful situations because they have a deep-seated fear of failure, stemming from a past experience.

2. Characters from Literature:

List 5 characters from literature and what motivated their actions throughout their respective stories.

For example, Shakespeare’sHamlet. His thoughts are motivated by revenge (because his uncle secretly killed his father), along with anger, sadness and confusion (because his mother married his uncle so soon after his father’s death).

Add to this a host of other factors, and you have a well-developed character you can understand.

3. Self reflection: 

Write paragraphs to describe

  1.  your most frightening experience
  2.  your happiest experience,
  3. your most stressful experience, and how you reacted to each situation.

After, list all the factors that motivated your behavior. How is your personality shaped by your motivations?

During the story (Or role play) it is important to remember these character motivations when your character makes choices.  That is really what this is about; identifying the motivations that make your character act the way that they do.  

During the plot, motivations may change, and should actually shift for the character to develop, but never all at once and never out of the blue.  Still the back story that drives your characters motivations will always be part of them.  

For instance; I write a character whose past has made her a survivalist but over the course of a year she shifts to protection of the family that she has developed.  However this took a full year to happen and her motivation of survival was never put on the back burner.  Instead it just expanded to protection of the group and not just herself.  Her fear of lose over this new family is what really drives her.

And there you have it: Keeping your character consistent through their motivation.

(via britishtea)